WR Case Knife Patterns 46-60

[00-15] [16-30] [31-45] [46-60] [61-75] [76-90] [91-105] [105-953] [Knives with no pattern number]


Pattern # 46

This pattern number has been used on at least two different knife patterns.

Case riggers marlin spike knifeThe most recent version is a 4 3/8″ knife usually known as either a rigging knife or marlin spike.  They have a master sheepfoot blade along with a marlin spike that locks opens on the back side of the knife. These blades are known for being useful when working with rope.  The large sheepfoot blade is ideal in making very clean cuts.  Rope is easily cut by placing the edge of the blade over the rope and striking the back with a hammer or other object.  These knives most always have a bail on the left side as well for easy carry.  Case started making them sometime prior to 1940 and they later discontinued them around 1976. Some were produced again in the early 80’s.
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Case’s oldest 46 pattern knife is a 3 5/8″ split back-spring hump bottom style whittler. W.R. Case & Sons started manufacturing them sometime prior to 1915. They were made with either a spear or clip master blade on the right side, and a spey and punch or spey and pen blade on the left.


Pattern # 046

W.R. Case and Sons produced a 3 5/8 ” hump bottom stockman knife prior to 1915 that was built on the same frame as the 46 pattern split back-spring whittler. These knives usually have a spear master, and pen blade on front, and a spey blade on the rear.

In 2009, Case brought the 046 pattern number back with a redesigned 3 5/8″ humpback stockman, whittler & half whittler knife.

Case 046 humpback stockmanThe stockman version of the more recent 046 pattern normally has a spear master blade along with sheepfoot & spey secondary blades.  The knife has two backsprings.  The spear & sheepfoot blades extend fron the front, & the spey extends from the back.
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Case 046 humpback whittlerThe whittler version of the more recent 046 pattern normally has a spear master blade along with spey & pen secondary blades. The knife has three backsprings. Each blade rides on its own spring with the master extending from the front & the two secondary blades extending from the back.  The pattern number is followed with the letters WH on the whittler version.
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Case 046 humpback whittlerThe two blade half whittler version of the more recent 046 pattern normally has a clip master blade along with a pen secondary blade. The knife has one back-spring.  Each blade rides on the same spring.
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Pattern # 47

The 47 pattern has been manufactured as a two, three, and four-bladed knife.

Case Double End Jack KnifeThe two-bladed 47 pattern is usually placed in the double end jack knife category and measures 3 7/8″ closed. As far as I know, they all have a 0 preceding the pattern number which denotes that the blades will be on opposite sides.  The knives normally have a clip master blade and either a pen or spear secondary blade. The spear bladed versions will have a J following the pattern number.  W.R. Case began producing them sometime before 1940.
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Case Stockman KnifeThe three blade 47 pattern is a 3 7/8″ multi-bladed knife that is part of the stockman family.  This particular member is larger  than most stockmans, so it is often called a large stockman. As far as I know, all 47 pattern knives  have a clip master blade, and most often have a sheepfoot and spey blade.  Some have been produced with various combinations of second and third blades which includes sheepfoot, spey, pen, and punch blades.Case introduced this pattern sometime prior to 1915.
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Case Four Blade Stockman KnifeBetween 1940 and 1978, Case manufactured some four-blade version of the 47 pattern as well. They usually have a clip, spey, sheepfoot, and punch blade.

I have seen Case use 47 frames to manufacture split-back whittlers as well. All of them that I have seen have a WH in the pattern number.


Pattern # 047

Case Stockman Knife With California Clip Master BladeThe 047 pattern is the same as the 47 except that it has a muskrat or California master clip blade in place of Case’s normal clip blade. W. R. Case & Sons started manufacturing these sometime prior to 1915.


Pattern # 0047

The 0047 pattern knives are the same as the 47 except that they do not have shields, and they have iron liners and iron bolsters unlike the 47’s nickel silver pins and bolsters.


Pattern # 048

Case Slimline Trapper KnifeThis pattern is a 4 1/8″ serpentine style jack knife that is usually called a bare-head trapper, slim-line trapper, or farmer’s knife. There is a one bladed version, and a two bladed version. The one blade version usually has a long clip blade, and the two blade version normally has a clip master blade and almost always a spey secondary blade. Some were produced with a pen secondary. Neither version usually has a left side bolster. Case has been manufacturing them since sometime prior to 1940.
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Pattern # 49

Case Copperhead KnifeThis pattern is a 4″ jackknife that is referred to as a large or big copperhead. Some collectors call them Vietnam knives. Most have two blades, but some older versions were made with a single blade. The master blade is most often a clip blade, but I have seen some with a wharncliff master blades as well. The other blade is most always a pen. Case started making these sometime before 1915.
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Pattern # 050

Case Large Coke Bottle KnifeThis is a jackknife that most collectors refer to as a swell center hunter, large coke bottle, or fiddle-back. Most recent versions measure 5 1/8″, but some older versions measure 5 3/8″ and I have seen in a few books that there are a few 5 1/4″ versions listed. The pattern has a single clip blade that is sometimes flat ground and sometimes saber ground. Those with a saber grind will usually have the letters SAB after the pattern number. Some of these knives have been produced with other features including a locking mechanism, and / or swing guard. Case’s 050 pattern dates back to the early Case Brothers era (1896 – 1915), and W.R. Case discontinued them after the 1976 production year. A few were manufactured in the early 80’s. Most have a C preceding the pattern number.
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Pattern # 50

Case Elephant Toenail KnifeThis pattern is a double end jack knife that measures 4 3/8″ (some Case Brothers measure 4″). They go by the names sunfish, elephant toenail, or English rope knife. The master blade is a spear, and the other is a pen blade. Case started manufacturing them sometime before 1915. Many believe that it was first designed to work with rope. The broad blade was ideal for driving through hemp rope with the use of a mallet.
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Pattern # 51

This number has been used on more than one pattern.

The oldest version of this pattern number is a 3 7/8″ lock-back knife that has a single clip blade. This version dates back to sometime prior to1915.

Early Case Hobo KnifeCase also assigned this pattern number to their first version of what is known as a hobo. They are 5 1/4″ knives that have clip master blades along with fork secondary blades. The knives split apart to be used together as utensils. Case started making them sometime prior to 1915.

Case 51 Lockback KnifeCase’s most recent version of the 51 pattern is a 4″ lock-back knife that was manufactured from the late 70’s to the early 90’s. They have a single blade that will be either a skinner blade or a clip blade that locks open. Because of this they will have an L following the pattern number. When the master blade is a clip, the knife will have a 1/2 following the pattern number as well.


Pattern # 051

This pattern is 3 3/4″ single bladed jack knife that is often called a fishtail. They will have a clip blade and what is called a fishtail left side bolster. Some versions have a guard on. Case started making the pattern sometime prior to 1915.


Pattern # 052

This pattern has been manufactured as a two, three and a four-bladed knife. All versions are most often referred to as medium congress knives. They measure 3 1/2″ when closed, which is larger than the 68 pattern congress but smaller than the 88 pattern.

Case Half CongressOn the two bladed version you will find that the master blade is most often sheepfoot, and the second a pen. The three blade usually has a sheepfoot master blade along with a spear and coping blade. The pattern was introduced sometime prior to 1940.

Case Three Blade CongressThe three blade version is the least common 52 pattern.   They will generally have a sheepsfoot, coping & pen blade.  I believe the 3 blade variation was first made in either the 1980s or early 1990s.

Case Medium CongressThe four bladed version normally has a Sheepsfoot master blade along with a pen, coping, and spear blade. They are the most popular 52 pattern & were introduced sometime before 1940.
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Pattern # 53

Prior to 1915, W.R. Case and Sons was manufacturing a 3 1/4″ equal end style cattleman’s knife. They generally have a spear master blade along with a pen, and spey blade.


Pattern # 053

This is a 2 3/4 ” equal end style pen knife. They generally have a spear master blade and a pen secondary that open on opposite sides. Some have been manufactured with a bail and without bolsters. Case introduced them sometime prior to 1940.
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Pattern # 54

Case XX Trapper KnifeThis pattern is a 4 1/8″ jack knife that is most well known as a trapper. Case started manufacturing them in the Tested era (1920 – 1940). The pattern will almost always have two blades; a clip and a spey of the same length. You may find two variations of clip blades on some older knives. In the mid 60’s, the company produced some knives with a narrower clip blade known as a muskrat, or California clip. Knives made with the narrow blade often trade at a higher value. The frame was changed in the early XX era to one that had longer bolsters (less handle material). Some trappers that were manufactured in the early XX era (1940 – 1964) were made on the tested frame which has shorter bolsters. These are much more valuable.
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Pattern # 54HB

Case 54 Hobo KnifeCase Hobo - Knife, Fork, SpoonAnother version of the 54 pattern is the hobo. It is the same as a trapper except that it splits apart and has a fork as a second blade. Starting in 2002, Case has manufactured the pattern with a a third blade that is a spoon. Hobo’s have the 54 pattern number, followed by the letters H and B that set it apart.
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Pattern # 54L

Case Four Blade Stockman KnifeCase came out with a single blade linerlock knife built off of the infamous 54 frame in the early 21st century. It has been given the name TrapperLock and is a much more modern-day knife that sports more modern features that include a pocket clip & thumb stud for one hand opening. They have a single clip point blade and measure 4 1/8″. The pattern number is followed by the letter L on these to signify that it is a locking knife.
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Pattern # 55

Case Seahorse WhittlerThis pattern is called seahorse or wharncliff whittler. The pattern was introduced, and had already been discontinued before 1940. Case reintroduced it in 2002. These knives have a wharncliff master blade along with a pen and coping blade that opens on the opposite side of the master. These knives measure 4″ when closed.
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Pattern # 055

The 055 pattern number has been used on at least three different knife patterns. There are two versions with three blades, and one with two.

The oldest 055 pattern was a 3 5/8″ serpentine style whittler that was being manufactured in the early Case Brothers days. These knives have a spear master blade that extends from the right side along with a coping and pen on the left side.

Another 055 pattern that has three blades is a small cigar or senator style knife that Case was manufacturing sometime prior to 1940.

Case Cigar Jack KnifeCase’s two-blade 055 pattern is a 3 1/2″ equal end jack knife that is most often called a small cigar or senator that Case started making sometime prior to 1940 and stopped making around 1976. They usually have a clip master blade and a pen secondary blade. The handle on the knife is a cylinder shape.
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Pattern # 056

Case has manufactured a two and three blade 056 pattern.

The two bladed version is a 2 7/8″ swell center pen knife. It was being produced by Case sometime prior to 1915. They have a spear and pen blade, and are very similar to Case’s more recent 156 pattern tuxedo. Case discontinued this version sometime prior to 1940.

The three bladed version is a 3 1/2″ swell center style whittler. They generally have a spear master blade, and a pen and file blade that extends from the rear. W.R. Case & Sons began manufacturing this version sometime prior to 1915.


Pattern # 58

Case Mako Lockback Hunting KnifeCases most recent version of this pattern is a 4 1/4″ lock-back folding hunter knife known as a mako. They have a single clip blade that locks opened. Because of this, it usually has an L after the pattern number. On many of these knives, there are no numbers preceding the 58. It often lacks the number used to identify the handle material, and the one used to identify the number of blades. Mako’s were introduced by Case around 1978.
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Pattern # 59

Case Hammerhead Lockback KnifeCase’s most recent 59 pattern is a 5″ lock-back folding hunter knife known as a hammerhead. These knives have a single clip blade that locks open. Case introduced them around 1978.
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