Anyone Familiar with Howards Sheffield 3 Blade folding pocket knives?

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GSPTOPDOG
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Anyone Familiar with Howards Sheffield 3 Blade folding pocket knives?

Post by GSPTOPDOG » Sat Oct 17, 2020 11:23 pm

I have a Howards Sheffield 3 Blade folding pocket knife. I got about 15 years ago and at some point ( ::facepalm:: not being the smartest guy in the room ::dang:: ) I put and epoxy on the sides to replace the missing scales. I reckon' this could be removed at some point, but at the time I wanted to carry and use it so it seemed like a smart idea and a quick fix. ::facepalm:: . The blades are tight, no wobble, good snap etc. I have seen other Howards Sheffield knives as claimed to being made before 1900, even in the 1860's. I have not found much other information on this knife. Any ideas on the age? Any other information in general would be of help. Thanks!
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richard
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Re: Anyone Familiar with Howards Sheffield 3 Blade folding pocket knives?

Post by richard » Sun Oct 18, 2020 1:17 am

NICE old whittler. would have had MOP SCALES. i suspect. get that epoxy off. buy some solvent . or put it in the freezer. then chip it off.then rescale it. with what you like. smooth bone would look good . just my opinion. ::paranoid::

How to Remove Epoxy from Metal and Hard Surfaces
Many of the removal techniques previously mentioned will also work on errant epoxy that dripped on metal or other hard, non-porous surfaces such as metal door jams or your favorite toolbox.

Metal is tough enough to stand up to chemical adhesive remover, usually sold in hardware stores as sprays or liquids (view example on Amazon) meant to be applied with a cloth. Be sure to wear gloves to protect your skin when using these chemicals, and carefully follow the manufacturer instructions.

An aerosol can of spray refrigerant freezes tough epoxy, making it brittle and easy to chip away with a scraper. This, too, is a dangerous chemical; gear up with safety goggles, gloves, and a respirator to avoid coming into contact with the vapors, and only work in a well-ventilated area.

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GSPTOPDOG
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Re: Anyone Familiar with Howards Sheffield 3 Blade folding pocket knives?

Post by GSPTOPDOG » Sun Oct 18, 2020 4:31 am

richard wrote:
Sun Oct 18, 2020 1:17 am
NICE old whittler. would have had MOP SCALES. i suspect. get that epoxy off. buy some solvent . or put it in the freezer. then chip it off.then rescale it. with what you like. smooth bone would look good . just my opinion. ::paranoid::

How to Remove Epoxy from Metal and Hard Surfaces
Many of the removal techniques previously mentioned will also work on errant epoxy that dripped on metal or other hard, non-porous surfaces such as metal door jams or your favorite toolbox.

Metal is tough enough to stand up to chemical adhesive remover, usually sold in hardware stores as sprays or liquids (view example on Amazon) meant to be applied with a cloth. Be sure to wear gloves to protect your skin when using these chemicals, and carefully follow the manufacturer instructions.

An aerosol can of spray refrigerant freezes tough epoxy, making it brittle and easy to chip away with a scraper. This, too, is a dangerous chemical; gear up with safety goggles, gloves, and a respirator to avoid coming into contact with the vapors, and only work in a well-ventilated area.
Thank you very much for the information! ::tu::

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