Rigging knives

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Ridgegrass
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Rigging knives

Post by Ridgegrass » Sat Sep 19, 2020 6:36 pm

If you like tools and riggers, here's a few you may enjoy.
Top Row: 1)George Ibberson, Sheffield, 2) Capt. Charles Currey, Chichester,England
Bottom row: 1)Joseph Rodgers Sheffield, 2) KA BAR, 3) Schrade, 4) ABL-Colin Winand, 1951, England, 5) Sealine, USA, (West Marine Brand)
To a sailor and fisherman, these are very useful, especially the "marlin spike". Great for untying tight knots. The term "marlin" refers to the light line used to whip rope ends, as opposed to the fish. The slotted blade and handle are shackle keys for stuck or tight shackle pins. J.O'.
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IMG_1408.jpg

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garddogg56
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Re: Rigging knives

Post by garddogg56 » Sat Sep 19, 2020 11:39 pm

Love'em and use 'em.You have a nice assortment ::tu::
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Re: Rigging knives

Post by eveled » Sun Sep 20, 2020 12:17 am

Nice collection! ::tu::

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Papa Bones
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Re: Rigging knives

Post by Papa Bones » Sun Sep 20, 2020 12:33 am

Ridgegrass wrote:
Sat Sep 19, 2020 6:36 pm
If you like tools and riggers, here's a few you may enjoy.
Top Row: 1)George Ibberson, Sheffield, 2) Capt. Charles Currey, Chichester,England
Bottom row: 1)Joseph Rodgers Sheffield, 2) KA BAR, 3) Schrade, 4) ABL-Colin Winand, 1951, England, 5) Sealine, USA, (West Marine Brand)
To a sailor and fisherman, these are very useful, especially the "marlin spike". Great for untying tight knots. The term "marlin" refers to the light line used to whip rope ends, as opposed to the fish. The slotted blade and handle are shackle keys for stuck or tight shackle pins. J.O'.
::tu:: ::tu:: Nice Group!!
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orvet
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Re: Rigging knives

Post by orvet » Sun Sep 20, 2020 7:49 am

Nice assortment.
I gave a Buck marlin spike knife to a Navy Corpsman in the 1980s. He was working in the Labors Union and he used the marlin spike for splicing cable and ropes.
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Benton629
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Re: Rigging knives

Post by Benton629 » Sun Sep 20, 2020 11:56 am

Ridgegrass wrote:
Sat Sep 19, 2020 6:36 pm
If you like tools and riggers, here's a few you may enjoy.
Top Row: 1)George Ibberson, Sheffield, 2) Capt. Charles Currey, Chichester,England
Bottom row: 1)Joseph Rodgers Sheffield, 2) KA BAR, 3) Schrade, 4) ABL-Colin Winand, 1951, England, 5) Sealine, USA, (West Marine Brand)
To a sailor and fisherman, these are very useful, especially the "marlin spike". Great for untying tight knots. The term "marlin" refers to the light line used to whip rope ends, as opposed to the fish. The slotted blade and handle are shackle keys for stuck or tight shackle pins. J.O'.
Those are nice. I love rigging knives.
Thanks for sharing.

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jerryd6818
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Re: Rigging knives

Post by jerryd6818 » Sun Sep 20, 2020 12:02 pm

I went looking to affirm my information on these knives was correct and learned something new in the process.

The new (to me) information is - The generic term for these knives is "Sailor's knife" or "Sailing knife". I did not know that.

What I was affirming was this. "The ones with locking spikes are known as rigger's knives, while the ones with non-locking spikes are known as yachtsman's knives."
https://neuseriversailors.com/special_f ... nives.html

Since it's "didja know" time, the Marlin in Marlin Spike has nothing to do with the billed fish. It's actually a name for the tool "Shaped in the form of a polished metal cone tapered to a rounded or flattened point, it is used in such tasks as unlaying rope for splicing, untying knots, drawing marline tight using a marlinspike hitch, and as a toggle joining ropes under tension in a belaying pin splice."

marline (plural marlines)
1.A light cord or rope used to bind the end of a larger rope, to prevent fraying.

2.Twine used similarly.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/marline

And

"Sailors who become proficient at knot tying, splicing, and sewing using the marlinspike are said to have mastered marlinespike seamanship, earning them the right to be known as marlin spikes or marlinspike seamen."

So now ya know. School dismissed. :lol:
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Benton629
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Re: Rigging knives

Post by Benton629 » Sun Sep 20, 2020 12:13 pm

Hey, I learned something new today! Thanks Jerry.

My first rigging knife came to me in an odd way.
I was working for a small airline in the Caribbean about 30 years ago and came home from night shift to find someone got into my house. Took a loaf of bread and left a rigging knife as payment. Nothing else touched and there was plenty of valuables to take.
Cop said it was probably one of the local Rastafarians that came out of the hills.
I still have that knife but can’t seem to remember where I put it..,

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Re: Rigging knives

Post by Ridgegrass » Sun Sep 20, 2020 12:27 pm

We have a nice Victorinox "Sailor's" knife. Not a standard pattern but has all the right blades, spike, shackle key. etc. J.O'.

knife7knut
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Re: Rigging knives

Post by knife7knut » Sun Sep 20, 2020 6:51 pm

I've posted these before but figured I'd throw them into the pile.
Attachments
100PerCentStainlessSteelJapanRigger'sKnife.JPG
Buck315Rigger'sKnife1.JPG
CoricamaRigger'sKnife.JPG
DiamondMark4BladeSailor'sKnife3 7.JPG
Geo.WostenholmSailor'sKnife.JPG
J.MonginYachtman'sKnife2018-1.JPG
KA-BAR Rigger'sKnife2.JPG
Schrade735SSRigger'sKnife1.JPG
SchradeBos'n'sMateRigger'sKnife.JPG
StainlessSteelJapanRopeKnife1.JPG
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Re: Rigging knives

Post by knife7knut » Sun Sep 20, 2020 6:52 pm

Couple more.
Attachments
Taylor'sEyeWitness1939Sailor'sKnife7.JPG
WhittingsloweAdelaide1573Sailor'sKnife7.JPG
KA-BAR Rigger'sKnife.JPG
E.RenaudArmesRigger'sKnife.JPG
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Benton629
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Re: Rigging knives

Post by Benton629 » Sun Sep 20, 2020 10:40 pm

Wow. Keep ‘em coming. I’m really enjoying these.

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edge213
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Re: Rigging knives

Post by edge213 » Sun Sep 20, 2020 11:12 pm

jerryd6818 wrote:
Sun Sep 20, 2020 12:02 pm
I went looking to affirm my information on these knives was correct and learned something new in the process.

The new (to me) information is - The generic term for these knives is "Sailor's knife" or "Sailing knife". I did not know that.

What I was affirming was this. "The ones with locking spikes are known as rigger's knives, while the ones with non-locking spikes are known as yachtsman's knives."
https://neuseriversailors.com/special_f ... nives.html

Since it's "didja know" time, the Marlin in Marlin Spike has nothing to do with the billed fish. It's actually a name for the tool "Shaped in the form of a polished metal cone tapered to a rounded or flattened point, it is used in such tasks as unlaying rope for splicing, untying knots, drawing marline tight using a marlinspike hitch, and as a toggle joining ropes under tension in a belaying pin splice."

marline (plural marlines)
1.A light cord or rope used to bind the end of a larger rope, to prevent fraying.

2.Twine used similarly.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/marline

And

"Sailors who become proficient at knot tying, splicing, and sewing using the marlinspike are said to have mastered marlinespike seamanship, earning them the right to be known as marlin spikes or marlinspike seamen."

So now ya know. School dismissed. :lol:
Interesting Jerr y, thank you.
David
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Ridgegrass
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Re: Rigging knives

Post by Ridgegrass » Sun Sep 20, 2020 11:36 pm

Knife7nut.. Love the one with the shackle key in the handle. Who made it? J.O'.

knife7knut
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Re: Rigging knives

Post by knife7knut » Mon Sep 21, 2020 3:47 am

Ridgegrass wrote:
Sun Sep 20, 2020 11:36 pm
Knife7nut.. Love the one with the shackle key in the handle. Who made it? J.O'.
French made by Jacques Mongin. The spike is actually hollow and the knife very light for it's size.Here is a pic of the underside of the spike.
Attachments
JMonginYachtsmanKnife 003.jpg
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