In praise of the humble coping blade.....

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Colonel26
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In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby Colonel26 » Mon Jun 10, 2019 9:42 pm

I was doing some work around the house today. mainly recaulking a leaking shower stall. I had decided this morning to pack one of my favorite edc knives, a Solingen Boker jumbo congress. When it came time to take our the old silicone the little removal tool was doing alright until I came to a corner. So out came the Poker and I opened up the coping blade and zip zap out came the silicone. so for the rest of the job a slice on top, a slice on the bottom, and them zip it out with the little tool. The old silicone came out slick as a whistle.

Many of my favorite using knives have a coping blade: Camillus 72, my congress knives, and my whittlers. A sheepsfoot, which I love too, has a straight edge as well, but there's something handy about that straight edge, thin blade with a pointy tip. We talk a lot about spear blades, clip blades, spey blades, pen blades, Wharncliff blades (which I can take or leave), but the coping blade doesn't get much play here it seems.

Am I alone? Anyone else appreciate the coping blade as much as I do?

Here's the old workhorse, still dirty from working.


IMG_3683.jpeg
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Re: In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby knife7knut » Mon Jun 10, 2019 10:20 pm

Coping blades to me work very well for trimming poster board and paper for patterns. For cutting intricate design patterns they are perfect.
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Re: In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby Colonel26 » Tue Jun 11, 2019 12:11 am

knife7knut wrote:Coping blades to me work very well for trimming poster board and paper for patterns. For cutting intricate design patterns they are perfect.


I bet it’s perfect for that.

Looks like you and I are the only ones!
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Re: In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby Lansky1 » Tue Jun 11, 2019 12:44 am

Nearly every knife I have has a "straight" edge blade of one form or another - either a sheepsfoot, wharncliffe or coping blade. I find that blade style indispensable ...
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Re: In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby cody6268 » Tue Jun 11, 2019 1:13 am

Most used blade for me. I only pull out the large blade on a Stockman if I have to cut rope or do some other large task. The spey is used either for peeling fruit, or when I've dulled the other blades.

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Re: In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby Dinadan » Tue Jun 11, 2019 2:40 am

I am also a fan of the coping blade. I usually carry a whittler of some kind with a coping blade. The coping blade gets used as much or more than any other blade. It is perfect for opening boxes and other small chores. I like sheepsfoot blades too. But on most knives that I owned with a sheepsfoot blade, all stockmans, the sheepsfoot blade sits kind of high to very high when closed. On my whittlers, the back of the coping blade usually aligns perfectly with the other secondary blade. Tht is much more comfortable when using the main blade.

Here are a couple of my favorite whittlers with a coping blade: a GEC 38 and a Craftsman 9488.
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GEC11.jpg
GEC Grinling 38
Craftsman11.jpg
Craftsman 9488
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Re: In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby Colonel26 » Tue Jun 11, 2019 2:52 am

Dinadan wrote:I am also a fan of the coping blade. I usually carry a whittler of some kind with a coping blade. The coping blade gets used as much or more than any other blade. It is perfect for opening boxes and other small chores. I like sheepsfoot blades too. But on most knives that I owned with a sheepsfoot blade, all stockmans, the sheepsfoot blade sits kind of high to very high when closed. On my whittlers, the back of the coping blade usually aligns perfectly with the other secondary blade. Tht is much more comfortable when using the main blade.

Here are a couple of my favorite whittlers with a coping blade: a GEC 38 and a Craftsman 9488.


Very nice whittlers. Don’t get me wrong, I love a good stout sheepsfoot. But a good thin coping blade is a much better tool for many jobs.

As to the sheepsfoot sticking up, the Camillus stockman Knives with the Indian Stag like the 78, 89, etc have a sheepsfoot that is even with the clip. I like those a lot.
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Re: In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby zoogirl » Tue Jun 11, 2019 3:33 am

It was straight edged when I bought it! This is definately my blade of choice on my work knife.
I mostly use it for cutting cardboard strips and scoring boards and edging to snap off.
I did actually try the blade on my 72 and it worked great, but I don’t really want that to be a work knife. The worker is just beat to heck.
253AB9FA-47D0-4AF8-BF76-CC6A36F03121.jpeg
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Re: In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby Colonel26 » Tue Jun 11, 2019 3:48 am

zoogirl wrote:It was straight edged when I bought it! This is definately my blade of choice on my work knife.
I mostly use it for cutting cardboard strips and scoring boards and edging to snap off.
I did actually try the blade on my 72 and it worked great, but I don’t really want that to be a work knife. The worker is just beat to heck. 253AB9FA-47D0-4AF8-BF76-CC6A36F03121.jpeg


I’ve got a few like that too. This one is near 80 years old. Still doing the business.

0DD03096-8A55-4B8E-B06E-6C735114229D.jpeg


Sheepsfoot blades definitely get the nod for heavy cutting. Use that coping blade on the 72 for the precise stuff. That’s one good thing about a congress, ya get both!
“There are things in the old Book which I may not be able to explain, but I fully accept it as the infallible word of God, and receive its teachings as inspired by the Holy Spirit.”
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Re: In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby Old Hunter » Tue Jun 11, 2019 9:56 am

I use a Coping and a Sheepfoot interchangeably, essentially the same blade except for size. I won’t long carry a knife that doesn’t have one or the other - main task for mine are cutting drywall samples and packaging - best blade in a pocketknife for that. OH
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Re: In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby Dinadan » Tue Jun 11, 2019 2:47 pm

Colonel26 wrote:Sheepsfoot blades definitely get the nod for heavy cutting. Use that coping blade on the 72 for the precise stuff. That’s one good thing about a congress, ya get both!

Good point about the congress having both sheepsfoot and coping!

I have a couple of knives with well worn coping blades. This one was like this when I got it: I would have retired it long before it hit this condition.
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Schrade with worn coping blade
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Re: In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby Mumbleypeg » Tue Jun 11, 2019 3:23 pm

That pointed tip on coping and sheepfoot blades is definitely handy. I just used one to cut a tangled mess of string from my mower blades. (Grandkids! :lol: ). It was perfect for picking out the tightly wound strands of string and cutting them. Using the point of a clip blade might have worked okay but possibly would have broken the tip off.

I have to say though that for opening boxes, many times a spey is better because you can cut the box with less danger of penetrating into the contents in the box. Especially when you just need to slice through some tape at the box seam or corners. ::tu::

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Re: In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby Colonel26 » Tue Jun 11, 2019 4:52 pm

Mumbleypeg wrote:That pointed tip on coping and sheepfoot blades is definitely handy. I just used one to cut a tangled mess of string from my mower blades. (Grandkids! :lol: ). It was perfect for picking out the tightly wound strands of string and cutting them. Using the point of a clip blade might have worked okay but possibly would have broken the tip off.

I have to say though that for opening boxes, many times a spey is better because you can cut the box with less danger of penetrating into the contents in the box. Especially when you just need to slice through some tape at the box seam or corners. ::tu::

Ken


Great point Ken. The ever useful spey gets little respect these days as well.
Dinadan wrote:
Colonel26 wrote:Sheepsfoot blades definitely get the nod for heavy cutting. Use that coping blade on the 72 for the precise stuff. That’s one good thing about a congress, ya get both!

Good point about the congress having both sheepsfoot and coping!

I have a couple of knives with well worn coping blades. This one was like this when I got it: I would have retired it long before it hit this condition.


Someone out there really loves that coping blade! On old stockman knives you find around here, there’s usually always more wear on the sheepsfoot blade than any other.
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Re: In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby KnifeSlinger#81 » Tue Jun 11, 2019 5:00 pm

Dinadan wrote:I am also a fan of the coping blade. I usually carry a whittler of some kind with a coping blade. The coping blade gets used as much or more than any other blade. It is perfect for opening boxes and other small chores. I like sheepsfoot blades too. But on most knives that I owned with a sheepsfoot blade, all stockmans, the sheepsfoot blade sits kind of high to very high when closed. On my whittlers, the back of the coping blade usually aligns perfectly with the other secondary blade. Tht is much more comfortable when using the main blade.

Here are a couple of my favorite whittlers with a coping blade: a GEC 38 and a Craftsman 9488.


Nice ones. The craftsman 9488 is an excellent tool.



Colonel26 wrote:I love a good stout sheepsfoot. But a good thin coping blade is a much better tool for many jobs.

As to the sheepsfoot sticking up, the Camillus stockman Knives with the Indian Stag like the 78, 89, etc have a sheepsfoot that is even with the clip. I like those a lot.


The schrade 861 and 61ot also have the sheepsfoot in line with the clip when closed. It is a very comfortable pattern to use.
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Re: In praise of the humble coping blade.....

Postby Colonel26 » Tue Jun 11, 2019 5:03 pm

KnifeSlinger#81 wrote:
Dinadan wrote:I am also a fan of the coping blade. I usually carry a whittler of some kind with a coping blade. The coping blade gets used as much or more than any other blade. It is perfect for opening boxes and other small chores. I like sheepsfoot blades too. But on most knives that I owned with a sheepsfoot blade, all stockmans, the sheepsfoot blade sits kind of high to very high when closed. On my whittlers, the back of the coping blade usually aligns perfectly with the other secondary blade. Tht is much more comfortable when using the main blade.

Here are a couple of my favorite whittlers with a coping blade: a GEC 38 and a Craftsman 9488.


Nice ones. The craftsman 9488 is an excellent tool.



Colonel26 wrote:I love a good stout sheepsfoot. But a good thin coping blade is a much better tool for many jobs.

As to the sheepsfoot sticking up, the Camillus stockman Knives with the Indian Stag like the 78, 89, etc have a sheepsfoot that is even with the clip. I like those a lot.


The schrade 861 and 61ot also have the sheepsfoot in line with the clip when closed. It is a very comfortable pattern to use.


As well as the Camillus 69. Much the same knives.
“There are things in the old Book which I may not be able to explain, but I fully accept it as the infallible word of God, and receive its teachings as inspired by the Holy Spirit.”
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