Understanding Pattern #15

GEC specializes in highly collectable and premium quality usable pocket knives. The company's USA manufactured knives have quickly proven to be a big hit with both collectors and users who seek quality American craftsmanship.
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knowtracks
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Re: Understanding Pattern #15

Postby knowtracks » Thu Feb 01, 2018 4:47 am

kootenay joe wrote:Thanks for this input guys.
Is the 2013 Tom's Choice Barlow i show in O.P. one of the first 2 runs of Charlie C's Barlows ? It not, what explains the nearly $500 selling price ?
There were many bidders, not just 2 guys bidding each other up.
kj



Yes Roland! The 1st release was in 2012, only one run was made, it has a spear main, there were 249 total pieces made. The knife you posted in the OP was from the second run in 2013, there were 3 different runs made that year with a total of 976 pieces made. For some reason, one what I understand, the Ebony covers seem to be the most sought after. That particular knife you posted there were 47 made in the second run with the Tom's Choice label in 2013.

Hope this helps!
Dave
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kootenay joe
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Re: Understanding Pattern #15

Postby kootenay joe » Thu Feb 01, 2018 1:38 pm

Big help. Thank you Dave.
kj

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Re: Understanding Pattern #15

Postby kootenay joe » Mon Feb 05, 2018 3:03 am

Right now, with 15 hrs left there is a 2016 #15 Tidioute "Tom's Choice" with a clip blade & jigged bone on ebay at $355.
GEC has brought a group of new people into the hobby of knife collecting & they focus just on the GEC knives. I hope some will discover vintage knives, and that knife collecting offers even more than just GEC collecting.
kj

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Re: Understanding Pattern #15

Postby JohnR » Mon Feb 05, 2018 4:00 pm

Roland, although I'm an older guy I'm fairly new to the knife collecting hobby. While I really like GEC knives I get more excited finding a good condition old knife, that really is my main focus.
What I appreciate about GEC is how they produce high quality recreations of the vintage knives. I have noticed at the Rendezvous that a lot of the younger collectors ,while there for GEC knives ,love it when we show our collection of vintage knives and many of them are also collecting vintage knives that appeal to them.
I think I commented to Charlie at the Rendezvous that I was surprised to see all the younger collectors and how that is good for our hobby, I do think GEC has played some part in that.

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Re: Understanding Pattern #15

Postby kootenay joe » Mon Feb 05, 2018 5:23 pm

John, i agree. Absolutely GEC has brought hundreds of people new to knife collecting into their following. At present most are dedicated GEC collectors and unaware of the rich & vast history of knives and the many fantastic vintage knives that can be collected. But, that's o.k. it is all under the broad arc of knife collecting.
kj

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Re: Understanding Pattern #15

Postby TokMac » Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:00 pm

kootenay joe wrote:John, you have Beautiful knives !
And Thanks for explaining the 15's. I think i now understand (somewhat): The #15 pattern has been made in so many variations that there are dedicated pattern 15 collectors. Only by being 'dedicated' can you know of every run of pattern 15 and which ones are harder to find. It is these dedicated 15 collectors who bid against each other and account for the very high prices for the rarer ones. It is not someone like myself who does not know an average 15 from a rare 15 who is bidding high, just the 'specialists'.
Is there a name for the blade that looks like a slender Sheepsfoot ? ( pic of 3 one of which has a 'scratted-like' handle)
kj


I'm quite new to AAPK, but I've been collecting GECs for several years now. I think some people refer to these slender sheepfoots as a "lambfoot" blade. I'm not sure if that's a term that has a history or even much traction, but it seems like a name used with some degree of consistency.

It also looks like you've had a lot of responses about your #15 question. I might only add that I think a mid-sized sleeve board is just very appealing to a lot of people. But almost always, a #15 barlow from GEC will just plain be more sought-after than some other kind of #15 (obviously there are exceptions). The point I'm trying to get a here is that, for some reason, there has been barlow-mania the past few years. In my humble opinion, there is little practical difference between a "TC" barlow and a "#15 Boys Knife" with a standard bolster. Is the barlow "stronger?" Sure, probably, that's the historical logic, anyway. But we're talking about traditional slipjoints, not tactical knives, so I think there is little difference. But I think there is a nostalgia that surrounds the barlow. Perhaps this is because you remember your grandfather used one or because you read about it a Mark Twain novel. For me, it just so happened that the first knife I ever bought (and subsequently lost) with my own money was a barlow. This, then, is why I believe the #15 barlow because more sought-after. Then, we people want something, it makes other people want it, even if they don't know why. What follows, then, is barlow-mania. :wink:

I think Charlie has done a a lot to the tubes and covers to make them a bit more collectible than other series. So that probably adds fuel.

As others mentioned, there are other sought-after #15s and the reasons can vary. People seem to love the stainless steel + elk, for example. Other knives, like the electrician knife are specialized and seemingly more rare compared to other large releases.

One thing I find fascinating about the barlows from GEC is that the break from normal conventions on them. Most every pattern is offered in a Tidioute trim and a Northfield trim. But the #15 barlow is ("seemingly") only a "TC" barlow...meaning Tidioute Cutlery. And the #77 barlow is only offered in a Northfield form. But if we look harder, things get a little more strange. The TC barlows are offered with both standard nail nicks AND the longpull and swedges that are normally reserved for Northfield versions. And the #77s have never really seen a Tidioute finish.

The easy response is to say this is because an individual paid for the tooling to be created, which is why Charlie Campagna has control over the TCs and Mike Latham over the NFs. But, still, there could have been a TC version of the #15 and a NF version of the #15. And the tooling for the bolster could have worked with both, only the engraving (or stamp?) would have been different. Same with the 77. I find it interesting that GEC diverted from their normal conventions on this one.

When we consider the #14 barlow and why there's been no SS barlow (a GEC version), the speculation continues. :D

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Re: Understanding Pattern #15

Postby kootenay joe » Thu Feb 22, 2018 3:01 am

Thanks for posting your thoughts on this rather complex situation. I think the "T.C." for the 15's refers to "Tom's Choice", referring to Tom Sawyer.
kj

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Re: Understanding Pattern #15

Postby knowtracks » Sun Feb 25, 2018 4:27 pm

Actually the "TC" stands for Tidioute Cutlery, Roland. If you go over to Bladeforums (yes I know) and read the first page of Charlie's "What makes a good Traditional Barlow" thread you will see. The "TC" bolster was the first thing any of the public ever saw of in this saga.

As for the blade shape used on the Ancient Barlow, it came from a Very old Barlow that Charlie has in his collection. It is not exactly a lambsfoot blade as the 2 photos included will show but I do suppose it could be considered a lambsfoot that the cutler simply skipped the step of adding the radius onto the spine of the blade to make the product less expensive. To tell you the truth I hadn't really thought about it before! ::hmm::
IMG_1752.JPG




IMG_2176.JPG



Dave
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kootenay joe
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Re: Understanding Pattern #15

Postby kootenay joe » Mon Feb 26, 2018 12:19 am

The first of the Charlie C #15 Barlow came out in 2014 and the pattern name is "Sawyer Barlow" for Tom Sawyer. That is where the confusion must have occurred as i have read the "Tom's Choice" for the TC on bolster quite a few times on BF.
Have there been any #15 Northfield Barlows or GEC Barlows (stainless) ?
kj


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