All About Pocket Knives
Loading



All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 30 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2011 1:46 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2011 2:36 am
Posts: 659
Location: South East Pennsylvania
What's the story with these I H Anderson knives.
Are they modern fakes? Can't be, The blades are stainless steel.
Are they a antique reproductions of civil War era knives made in the early 20th century?
Anyone know anything about them other than what you get when you use a search engine.
The info found is kind of obscure and not definitive enough.
Been searching off and on for years about this maker.
J W


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2011 12:18 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2006 8:39 pm
Posts: 3205
Images: 0
Location: Bedford, UK
I'd be interested in seeing some photos if possible please. :) s-k

_________________
Rust Never Sleeps


Top
 Profile Personal album  
 
PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 4:21 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2011 2:36 am
Posts: 659
Location: South East Pennsylvania
smiling-knife wrote:
I'd be interested in seeing some photos if possible please. :) s-k


I got these four knives years ago while on a road trip with my Father down to Florida.
Stopped at a roadside flea market in Georgia and got all four knives for $10.00 .
Got a story from the seller that they were found in a very old abandon house in the area that was in dilapidated condition.
From the look and condition of the knives they do look like they were exposed to the elements.
Obviously the seller took a grinder or heavy sandpaper to the blades to get the corrosion off probably to read the stamp.
At first they looked to be Civil War era kitchen knives from the lead inlay but then I noticed the stainless steel blades.
I figured what the heck I like the old way they look so I bought them.
The seller was asking $10 each and I talked em down to $10 for all of them because of the condition.
Over the years I’ve done some research and have come up with a lot of different answers.
From being made in an old foundry in Georgia, being from Norway or Scandinavia to even being made in the 60’s or 70’s by Hippies.
I had them for so long and they just sat in a drawer so I decided to restore at least one of them.
So I picked the only one that was a small butcher type and started the restore.

“sorry no before pictures. I wasn’t thinking” But the knife was in the same condition as the others but has a better and more legible makers stamp. Image

Image
Reshaping and cleaning up the blade as the tip was corroded and most of the edge, was fairly easy.
The hard part was replacing the missing inlayed pewter.
I couldn’t get the new lead solder (which I used instead of pewter) to stick to the old original pewter. It just kept falling out.
But after thinking over it for awhile I thought why not use flux like you do when you solder.
Worked like a charm.
The wood which I think is walnut or Mahogany was so weather beaten that when the lead inlaying and hand sanding was done I decided to soak the handle in linseed oil to stabilize everything then a couple of coats of tung oil on top to waterproof.
The knife turned out pretty well and makes a mean little fishing knife.
The other three knives I think I might restore in the near future if I can’t find some definitive answers to the history of them. They'll make good filet knives.
Image
Image
Image
P S - One of the knives has different stamp lettering than the others (what’s left of the stamping)

J W


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 7:23 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 16, 2006 6:23 am
Posts: 11560
Images: 90
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
JW- I think originally they used pewter for the casting.
Pewter is an alloy of tin, though I guess the lower grades of pewter can contain lead.
I am not an expert on it, but I imagine the pewter might be easier to cast than the lead.
Nice save though!

_________________
Dale
AAPK Administrator

orvet@comcast.net
Please visit my AAPK store: http://www.allaboutpocketknives.com/kni ... e37-y.html

"Buy more ammo!" - Johnnie Fain


Top
 Profile Personal album  
 
PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 2:56 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2011 2:36 am
Posts: 659
Location: South East Pennsylvania
orvet wrote:
JW- I think originally they used pewter for the casting.
Pewter is an alloy of tin, though I guess the lower grades of pewter can contain lead.
I am not an expert on it, but I imagine the pewter might be easier to cast than the lead.
Nice save though!


Yea, Dale I know you are right.
Pewter is what the castings are made of.
I was a little tired when I wrote this post and wasn't thinking straight.
Old Pewter is mostly tin with some copper and lead added.
They don’t use lead anymore.
I just used what I had laying around which was a bar of lead solder for old cast iron waste pipes. It contains mostly lead some nickel, copper and a little silver.
It worked and looks just like the original pewter.
I don't plan on using the knife in my kitchen every day and I don't think the small amout of lead would hurt you even if I did.
I guess I need to edit my original posting.
I don't think these knives are worth much but I do like the look of them.
Hopefully I will be able to find the true story behind them some day.
Thanks

J W


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 7:57 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 16, 2006 6:23 am
Posts: 11560
Images: 90
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
I agree, they are neat. ::tu::
I have several old forks with the pewter inlays.
Cool, but not worth much; usually $1-$3 at a flea market. :lol:

_________________
Dale
AAPK Administrator

orvet@comcast.net
Please visit my AAPK store: http://www.allaboutpocketknives.com/kni ... e37-y.html

"Buy more ammo!" - Johnnie Fain


Top
 Profile Personal album  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 1:43 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2011 1:25 am
Posts: 11
I H Anderson was my great grandfather. He made knives in the early 1900's in Highland Ohio.
The only knife that I have is made by Shaw & Slavsky Cutlery Detroit ,Mi. It says that it is a handmade hollow ground stainless steel knife made under his secret formula.There is a U.S. patent number 154,710 on the handle. Jack Jones


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 4:11 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 11:22 pm
Posts: 7271
Images: 0
Image
Image

_________________
AAPK Janitor #3607
Read The Jigged Bone Handles
If It Has A Cutting Edge I Probably Collect It

"To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" Thomas A. Edison


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 5:25 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 16, 2006 6:23 am
Posts: 11560
Images: 90
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Jack ::welcome:: to AAPK!

It as always great to have someone who has a family connection to the old craftsmen who made the knives we all admire and collect.
We would love to hear more about him. ::nod::

Dale

_________________
Dale
AAPK Administrator

orvet@comcast.net
Please visit my AAPK store: http://www.allaboutpocketknives.com/kni ... e37-y.html

"Buy more ammo!" - Johnnie Fain


Top
 Profile Personal album  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 2:09 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2011 2:36 am
Posts: 659
Location: South East Pennsylvania
JACKHACK wrote:
I H Anderson was my great grandfather. He made knives in the early 1900's in Highland Ohio.
The only knife that I have is made by Shaw & Slavsky Cutlery Detroit ,Mi. It says that it is a handmade hollow ground stainless steel knife made under his secret formula.There is a U.S. patent number 154,710 on the handle. Jack Jones


Mr. Jones,
Any more info on your Great Grandfather would be appreciated.
I have been searching for years for info about these knives and so has a lot of other people.
Were these particular knives with your Great Granddad's name marked on them his own creation or did he always work for a cutlery company?
What was your Great Granddad's first and middle name (I. H.)?
Any more info would help.
Thanks very much~

J W


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 4:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jun 12, 2010 12:07 am
Posts: 394
Images: 0
Location: Scottsboro, Al
Thanks Mr. Jones for sharing with us and do come back to see us. Neat knives and neat history.


Top
 Profile Personal album  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 5:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2011 2:36 am
Posts: 659
Location: South East Pennsylvania
I looked up that patent number.
It's for Iron school desks in the late 1800's.
Check the number again.
Also these knives I have are stainless but are flat ground with a secondary bevel and not hollow ground.

J W


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 12:47 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2011 1:25 am
Posts: 11
The patent number was wrong. It is 754,719,but that does not connect to the knives.I have pictures to send and a letter with his letter head.Give me some time to figure how to get them to this forum. I am somewhat computer illerate, but I will figure it out. Jack Jones


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2011 9:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2011 1:25 am
Posts: 11
This is a letter from I H Anderson to my father in 1939. They didn't have spellcheck back then. If this works I'll have more to follow. Jack JImageones


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2011 10:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2010 3:37 pm
Posts: 1202
Location: Burton,Michigan
Wecome to AAPK's Jack and thanks for sharing your letter!

_________________
NEVER DOUBT YOUR DAWG


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 30 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group